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. they now expect more than 40 percent of the claims to be back law during either of these two years. so in revising these projections what matters did you look at and what did they -- what additional you? >> i looked at the actual submissions of receipts of claims that we have received from our veterans of the last five months. each month they have been lowered and are expected volume. >> the math works out to where you would have only a 40% backlog situation. >> no, it doesn't. i don't think that you all would throw me out of here if i said that that would happen. is now where we are. we are at about 69 percent of our plans right now that our older than 125 days, working every single day to drive that never south. we're doing it to focus on how people process technology solutions. as far as we can pushing a productivity by folks from i can tell you today that 70 percent more effective and higher productivity than they were prior to us moving into this transformation plan. >> last year he testified that during 2013 the backlog would be reduced from 60% to 40%, and that would -- and ' --
background is in the law and, actually, he began his background in law at his family's kitchen table. his father, rex lee, was a law school dean, assistant u.s. attorney general and solicitor general for ronald reagan. senator lee is a graduate of brigham young university and byu law school, was a law clerk for judge dean benson of the u.s. district court of the district of utah and then judge sam alito's clerk when he was at the u.s. court of appeals for the 3rd circuit. he served as an attorney -- assistant u.s. attorney general in utah and general counsel to the governor of utah before turning to private practice. and then in 2010, that important election year, he decided to run united yorking out an -- knocking out an incumbent u.s. senator and a party-endorsed candidate to become the primary candidate and win the general election. senator lee is now on the judiciary committee, serves as ranking member of the antitrust competition policy and consumer rights subcommittee. he also sevens on the armed service -- serves on the armed services committee and the joint economic committee and
,ming. mr. presiden this amendment protects the privacy and sety of law-abiding gun owners. when government officials release gun ownership information it puts many lives at risk. this includes the lives of lawful gun owners, the lived of law enforcement and the lives of ctheic violence. state or local governments that release private gun owner information will be penalized 5% of their federal program funding. this includes the release of private information on individuals 0 who have licenses to purchase or who possess or who carry firearms. the funding that's withheld will then be redistributed to the states that are in compliance. this amendment will ensure that gun owners across the nation do not have their private gun owner information publicly released. thank you, mr. president. and i urge all my colleagues to support the amendment. mr. leahy: mr. president? the presiding officer: the senator from vermont. mr. leahy: this is a case of washington being big brother and telling each one of the states whether it's wyoming, vermont, or connecticut here's what you have to do. we have no idea
in for a long time. the law requires that. beyond that we don't know for sure. we have had difficult negotiations over the second part that have the guest worker program and make sure that it's both at will and contract so it serves all of agricultural. because we know at some point we need additional workers beyond the highly trained skilled workers that are currently doing the work in the country that are likely to get a blue card. there will be additional workers needed down the road. we have to a viable worker program. the current program is not that program. if we have the blue card program in our existing h2a we would be back here in a few years, senator, telling you we have a big problem. >> my time is . >> that's what we've got avoid. we have to make sure we don't make the same mistake as 1986. >> thank you. we have two unique situations on the committee, as we mentioned with senator cornyn who had to be absent and all of us understand why. there's no question he should have been in texas and was. the other senator feinstein who is handled the ag negotiations. both will be gi
, led negotiations for the reimplication of east east germ. he is proficient in economics of law, a doctor of law, and he's written a number of books most recently "the future of modernization: what we can learn from the crisis," and, mr. minister, delighted you with are us, look forward to the remarks, and we'll then pepper you with questions. >> thank you very much. sorry for being late, tday,r thout and minds are on the people in boston. we hope it will be over soon. i have to make some remarks, and in europe, and what i wanted to say, we are the member -- [inaudible] we all know the summit in london , up to the meeting today, and we have made a lot of progress. we agree. [inaudible] too much in the european markets,. it is three main issues we are working on. i think in the open markets, we made last couple years, and that is not. in liberty, finance, and marks, we have a different opinion. aits issue as of late. we have to continue in this country. what we've done in europe, and bond markets, banking. [inaudible] financial markets and it is a very -- [inaudible] everyone at
of prosperity and of nations living by rule of law and of nation's living in peace. countries where strong human rights prevail our countries where people do better, economies thrive, rule of law is stronger, governments are more effective and more responsive, and they are countries that lead on the world stage and project stability across their regions. strong respect for human rights isn't merely an indicator that a country is likely doing well. it actually unleashes a countries potential, and it helps to advance growth and progress. so i ask you just to think of the country like burma for a minute. because of steps towards democratic reform and stronger human rights protections, a country that had been isolated for years is now making progress. as it reached where we wanted to be? know, but it's on the road. it's moving. and more people are contributed economy and participating in the government, leading toasr growth andnt. and by starting to embrace universal rights, the burmese government has opened the doors to a stronger partnership with their neighborhood and with countries around the wo
of retirement and health care benefits is consistent with what is required by the federal law of ups, federal express and every other almost every other corporation in the country it would be very similar. >> it could be different from what the private sector companies are doing. i would like to know, i would like to make that available to the postal employees that i represent throughout the country. >> you are correct but it's not the same for health care benefits. i will provide a more detailed record. >> you are saying the postal service now is operating at 140% of current revenue; is that the number you gave? >> drm laes, unfunded liabilities. >> bankruptcy would probably be where they are. >> finally let me go to something completely unrelated. you testified he wanted more flexibility in their rates in respect to packaging the monopoly on first-class they would have it facto monopoly on the third clause catalogs and what people would refer to as door hangers and nobody has the reach you do. how do you give that flexibility without giving you the power to do sweetheart deals and take the
the audience. please wait until you get a microphone before u.s. to because of laws we will pick you up on camera. u.s. a question? down here in front. you have to wait for the microphone. and copley's to do as a favor. not accusing you, don't make a speech. as the question. >> my question is whether their is a real parallel between the argument for abolishing slavery and the argument for abolishing war. >> sounds like that's yours. >> the question is, is there real parallel? i don't know. the point that i was trying to make was i think every generation does seven things and italy. we do things that make us more -- morally queasy, but we think we have to do them. i would say that for our generation as for pretty much every generation before us, war is one of those things. again, ask for a show of hands. how many people think the war is a good thing and have many people think that war should never be used as a policy? >> we are then obviously all conflicted. i think if you look back on previous generations, to think that we can't morally understand how honest, sincere people could believ
led the negotiations for the reunification of east germany. he is proficient in economics and law and vlad holds a doctorate of law and is written a number of books most recently the future of modernization, what we can learn from the crisis. mr. minister we are delighted you are with us and we look forward to your remarks and then we will pepper you with questions. >> thank you very much. sorry for being late. today we are, our hearts and minds are with boston and i hope it will be over soon. i have to make remarks on the financial markets that are going well in europe as you all know. [laughter] i will be brief to have time for discussion and therefore i just want to say we all remember the crisis that started in the united states in 2008 and in 2008 we all agreed it will never happen again. we have to learn our lessons. the summit to london and pittsburgh and a two the g20 meeting today in boston. we have made a lot of progress in doing this since then. we agreed that the reason -- there are three reasons. too much -- too much liquidity in the financial markets and too few regu
by will you -- must include the contributions of the transgendered? by law. you will have to have pages on transgendered contributions. people who were crossed over sex, or dressed in the other sex. clothing. isn't that absurd? isn't that totalitarian? i thought the purpose of the textbook was to tell the truth, not make groups feel good. but as i point out in the book, leftism is overwhelmingly rooted in feelings. >> host: dennis prager is the author. "still the best hope" is the name of his recent best seller. louis from florida, you're on the air. you're talking with dennis prager. >> caller: i'd like to ask mr. prayinger and his ilk what he just said about truth, why should people believe the bible when that's the biggest novel ever written? who believes the earth is 5,000 years old? how can you follow a book that tells you the world is 5,000 years old and hisclass commentary about the christian schools and the seminary, how does he say something like that and he wants to be honest? i know this man is a right winger, and he wouldn't fifth credit to anybody, but my main question is,
human rationality. people do all kinds of really stupid things. we enact stupid laws sometimes that a lot of people agree on more because certain interest groups influence others. look at the gun legislation. yeah it's for the failure to enact it is driven by the economic interest of a certain small bunch of businesses but is that really why a huge number of other individuals who believe that's a good thing to do or wildly misinterpret the second amendment because they feel it within themselves. with regard to slavery and you jumped off from that, one of the things that became and has become clear to me the more i have delved into the world of the slave owner it's self and indeed the pre-emancipation north where it wasn't really all that different, is that a lot of people really liked slavery. they liked it. yes it was profitable but it wasn't always all that profitable and a motivator particularly in the 19th century was much of the south it was up into the respectable middle class to own a slave. it gave you a status in the stature that you might not have otherwise so why did
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11